And Justice for All…

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Goodbye Blogger

I am sad to say that I have decided to move away from blogger.  Its been a little complicated to use properly and now with the lose of reader I feel like its better for me to move on.

Good news the blog will continue just over at WordPress ūüėÄ  Come by check out the new blog Life in a Different Direction . I am super happy with it, and with WordPress! Super simple to use and the features are amazing.  Glad I have tried all the different ways to blog I have learned so much in such a short time, and with actually blogging its a better way of testing out each service; so much better then reading a ‘Dummies’ book. Sorry Blogger, but I am still a Chrome fan girl!  AND totally addicted to your Google a Day Game! So I won’t be completely gone, promise.

I hope all my readers will follow me over, the content is only getting better and better as I learn what I am doing with this whole blog thing, and of course you can always find me at designsbylizz.co.  My shop is the next big move so make sure to watch for that; the goal is May 23rd Grand Opening! Super excited!!

Have a great weekend and enjoy y’all

Lizz

Just a word of advice girls! 

Easy Marbled Easter Eggs

A friend gave me this easy way to make marble look Easter eggs, I would using suggest gloves and tongs as you are working with straight dye not diluted. You are going to luv the results

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First get regular shave cream not gel. You want to use containers that you don’t mind if they get stained and spray a good amount of cream in.

Next with your dyes simply dot the cream. ¬†Since I mixed my own colors I actually used a paintbrush to dab the dye on the shaving cream. Then with a toothpick swirl. Don’t mix, just swirl together, otherwise you will just get a nicely colored egg but not a marbled.

I used one pan and started with a teal green that I created by mixing colors together, blue and green more green then blue. ¬†Choose colors that you like; you don’t have to be super fancy or artistic, do what you enjoy.

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This is my final cream mixture using a teal, orange and yellow dye.

Remember crafting should be fun, so play with it!

Now take your egg (hard-boiled or hollowed) and roll it gently through the mixture making sure to cover entire egg.  Gently set aside to dry, I used the egg crate so as not to wipe off any of the shave cream.

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That’s the teal color painted onto a piece of egg shell in the background. Isn’t it beautiful? I just luv teals, peacocks, aquas, all the greens.

I then added orange (red-yellow) and rolled an egg through.

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Orange and Teal

Finally I added some neon yellow and rolled one more egg.

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Teal and Neon Yellow

Now the hard part, waiting for the dyes to set on the egg.  Give it about 15 mins. Then simply wipe off the cream with a paper towel and viola gorgeous marbled eggs!

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This is how I set mine to let them dry while waiting.

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I think these would be beautiful on an Easter buffet as hard-boiled eggs.

Beautiful Marbled Eggs

Enjoy Y’all

Lizz

My Irish Heritage

I am a Newberry and my paternal Grandmother was an O’Hare. ¬†I am the descendant of a long and proud line of Irishmen and woman.

The name ‘Newberry’ is actually Norman from Le Newbourg in Central Normandy,¬†anglicized to de Newburgh, meaning new town. ¬†The head of the family was¬†Roger de Beaumont, ¬†a powerful noble, he was a part of the Norman Conquest in 1066 with William the Conquer, his second cousin. ¬†They battled by his side at the Battle of Hastings. ¬†As reward for their service and loyalty with many English lands and titles.

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Roger de Beaumont was nicknamed ‘La Barbe’ because he wore a beard and moustache, while most Normans were clean shaven. It is said that this is him likeness can be seen in the ‘Bayeux Tapestry’ which depicts the feast after the Battle of Hastings.

My ancestors did not get to Ireland until the 1600s when Colonel Thomas Newburgh, was sent by there by decrees of King Henry VIII, then King James of Scotland and finally Charles I, to ‘shire’ or ‘plantation’¬†the¬†country.

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16th Century Irish Soldiers a wood craving by Albercht Durer

Then in 1725 my 5th Great-Grandfather was born in Donegal, Ireland. ¬†Then when he was just a boy in the 1730s he stowed away on a ship bound for the Colonies in America. ¬†Of course he was discovered and was then sold into servitude to a blacksmith who used him as an indentured apprentice for 7 years. The ship landed in Virginia and Samuel later settled in Montgomery, Bland County, Virginia. He built a home called ‘Newberry’s Run’. ¬†He assisted in the Revolutionary War by providing provisions and supplies to the troops under General George Washington.

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The green countryside of Donegal County, Ireland

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The countryside of Bland County, Virginia

His grandson, Henry Clay Newberry, was one of the original settlers of Texas, where my father was born.  In the 1930s my family left Texas for California.  They were forced from their land by the depression, drought and the dust bowl.

I never got a chance to discuss family history with my father, he passed when I was only 19 and at that time I was definitely not into genealogy.  His mother died of the Spanish Flu when he was only 6 months old and his father died when I was 4.  The family was a complete mystery to me, we (my brothers and sisters) assumed they were English who migrated much later then the 1730s.  This discovery of our ancestors was a complete surprise to all of us, and a welcome one especially for me.  I have been a lifelong Anglophile and this was like finding the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.  Pure gold. I highly recommend using Ancestry.com to search out your ancestors and family history. My sons have used the family history in several papers they have had in history classes over the years. It really helped them be more interested in history when they could relate it to a family story.

I am a proud Irish-American.

Enjoy Y’all

Lizz